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Mont Tauch launches sweet wine range

Published:  17 March, 2010

French wine producer, Mont Tauch, is rolling out a new range of sweet wines which will be launched at the Big Fortified Tasting on April 19 at London's Glazier's Hall.

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Diageo launches Bushmills competition

Published:  16 March, 2010

 

Diageo has launched a Facebook competition offering the winner a chance to work alongside its master distiller at its Bushmills Irish whiskey distillery.

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Fine Wine of Croatia comes to LIWF

Published:  16 March, 2010

Fine Wine of Croatia is launching its wines to the London International Wine Fair in its first generic drive in the UK.

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wines in the Press- March 12-14

Published:  16 March, 2010

The Guardian

 

Victora Moore says it isn't difficult to guess which of the world's vineyards might command the highest prices, but one place that stands out as odd is Italy's Alto Adige.

 

"This is unexpected," says Moore "Or at least it was to me. Once part of Austria, and Italy's most northerly wine-producing area, this alpine region, with its immaculate mountain lakes, frosted rocky pinnacles, narrow valleys, vineyards at 400-500m, ski slopes, and steaming platefuls of canederli (speck dumplings) is not a place with which even oenophiles are necessarily familiar, not least because it produces only 0.7% of Italy's wine."

 

Dr Heike Platter of the Laimburg Research Centre of Agriculture says: "The climate is very good. We have 300 days of sunshine a year, but very little space for cultivation, so land is precious."

No surprise, then, that the wine is not cheap says Moore.

She recommends; St Michael Eppian Pinot Grigio 2008 (£9.99, Waitrose). Josef Weger Pinot Grigio 2008 (£13.50, keith@viaggiovino.co.uk) and Weingut Niklas Lagrein 2007 (£10.15, slurp.co.uk; £10.80, Les Caves de Pyrene).

 

Telegraph

 

Susy Atkins is considering Mother's Day presents and suggests a bottle of golden dessert wine. She feels a glass of cool, sweet wine, to accompany one of Diana Henry's apple pies, is sure to be treasured.

 

"Some wines have inherently sweet, appley flavours. Try the crisp, light, delicate dessert wines of Germany, or the baked-apple-and-walnut nuances of sweet Chenin Blanc, which usually hails from the Loire in France. Slightly lighter demi-sec Vouvray - also a Loire Valley Chenin - can be a delight."



She recommends; Clos De Nouys 2007 Vouvray Demi-Sec, France (£9.99 Waitrose, 37.5cl) and
Darting Estate Eiswein 2007, Germany (£14.99 Marks & Spencer, 37.5cl).

 

Times

Bob Tyrer is advising on how to find the perfect wine. He likes Liberty wines as they tend to be "a bit out of the way, unusual, characterful, occasionally a revelation, sometimes expensive, but so interesting and agreeable that I think I've got something worthwhile for my money."

 

He asked managing director of Liberty David Gleave, Liberty, how to find a fantastic bottle of wine?

 

A few of Gleaves answers were; look for good customer service, spend a little bit more, focus more on the region than the vintage and visit local independent retailers, rather than just relying on supermarkets.

 

He added, ask for full traceability if you're buying at auction. "Make sure the auction house can tell you how the wine has been stored - it should have been in a good cellar, with a constantly low temperature, and it shouldn't have been moved often."

 

The Independent

 

Wine of Australia put on a blind tasting of 50 "world class" Chardonnays at this year's annual tasting, says Anthony Rose.

 

He lists the three groups as; crisp and refreshing, fine and elegant and rich and complex.


Rose says the first group contained everyday wines that failed to set his pulse racing. He favoured the 2008 De Bortoli Estate Chardonnay, the Jacobs Creeks' 2005 Reeves Point Chardonnay and the Punt Road's 2008 Napoleone Vineyard Chardonnay.

 

Rose says the second section lived up to its billing, with amongst others the Giant Steps Arthur's Creek 2008 Chardonnay, (£17.80, OW Loeb).

 

In the final group, Rose recommends the zesty-intense 2008 Ten Minutes by Tractor McCutcheon Vineyard, (£18.49-£20.15, The Wine Library).

 

He adds: "Overall, though, this was a confident demonstration, showing that Australian Chardonnay is back, and by some distance its greatest white hope for the future."

 

 

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Gonzalez Byass and Benevolent host sherry master class

Published:  15 March, 2010

Gonzalez Byass and The Benevolent are to host a Sherry Master Class on March 22 with all proceeds being donated to the charity.

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Finalists in the Northern Hospitality Awards

Published:  15 March, 2010

The shortlisted finalists in the Northern Hospitality Awards have been announced from a record number of entries.

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Oddbins joins British Retail Consortium

Published:  15 March, 2010


Oddbins has agreed to become a full member of the British Retail Consortium and help with its lobbying activities particularly around alcohol.

 

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Liberty take on Laroche wines in the UK

Published:  12 March, 2010

Liberty Wines is to be the exclusive UK importer for three Laroche estates: Domaine Laroche (Chablis), Mas La Chevalière (Languedoc) and Viña Punto Alto (Casablanca Valley, Chile).

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World's oldest malt released at £10,000

Published:  12 March, 2010

Whisky specialist, Gordon & MacPhail has unvieled the world's oldest single malt whisky.

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Chilean earthquake update

Published:  12 March, 2010

More producers and importers of Chilean wines have been outlining the impact the earthquake has had on their business.

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Time right for Funkin expansion

Published:  11 March, 2010

The Funkin cocktail purée brand is moving into the US market and expanding its UK operations.

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Root beer and espresso for Smirnoff

Published:  11 March, 2010

Smirnoff is launching its first 100-proof flavoured vodkas. The 50% abv spiced root beer and dark roasted espresso vodkas are being introduced into the US market as extensions to the Smirnoff blue brand.

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Bars featured on new Appleton website

Published:  11 March, 2010

Appleton Estate rum has launched a new website that will showcase the best bars around the world that serve cocktails made with the spirit.

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Gallo drops brands from UK to concentrate on core ranges

Published:  10 March, 2010

E& J Gallo is to stop distribution of a number of key lines in the UK as part of its ongoing restructuring of its UK operation.

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Matthew Clark backs Chile and Rhône in the on-trade

Published:  10 March, 2010

 

Matthew Clark  sees Chile and the Rhône as the two big winners in the UK on-trade in 2010. 

 

 

 

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Diageo makes female executive chart

Published:  10 March, 2010

Diageo is the only drinks company to be named in a list of the top 50 companies for women executives.

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Wines of Chile sets up UK quake appeal

Published:  10 March, 2010

Wines of Chile has established a UK appeal to raise money for victims of the country's earthquake.

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D&D takes on French agencies

Published:  09 March, 2010

D&D Wines International has been appointed as the principal off-trade agent for Jeanjean Languedoc and RIGAL.

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Spanish agencies for PLB

Published:  09 March, 2010

PLB has added two Spanish producers to its portfolio: Navarra's Bodegas Ochoa and Rioja's Miguel Merino.

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Wines in the Press- March 4-7

Published:  09 March, 2010

The Guardian

Victoria Moore says the more interested in wine she gets, the more she's prepared to spend on it.
Sometimes and undemanding £5 wine suits, others she'll happily part with £10 or £15 for a bit more sophistication and finesse.

Tesco wine buyer Graham Nash says it's often fear, not excitement, that persuades people to part with a few more quid than normal. He calls this "the distress purchase - they want to make sure the wine's all right and can't think of any way other than spending a bit more".


Moore says, this is not misguided as couple of extra pounds in this price bracket provides a disproportionate boost to the amount you're spending on the wine itself (as opposed to the bottle, cork, duty). Unfortunately, in the other directions people go scooting towards well-known brands and regions for safety which is far from guaranteed to do them any favours.

 

The Times

In his new column, Tim Atkin MW, writes about the recent fake French Pinot Noir fraud, where a dozen Frenchmen were found guilty of selling incorrectly labelled wine to the E & J Gallo Winery.


Atkin says it's not the only recent scandal involving France's largest wine region. Nearly half a million bottles of counterfeit Fitou were rumbled in China last week, this time the fraudsters were Chinese, not French.


Allegations of nefarious goings on are numerous, but proof is hard to find, adds Atkin. Examples include the 1970 vintage in Rioja, which some estimate was sold at least twice over and cheap Italian Pinot Grigio, that was cut with everything from Trebbiano to tap water.


"So can you trust the wine in your glass? Yes, most of the time. The wine business is highly regulated, but even without the threat of legal sanction, most winemakers are honest. Wines generally come from the place, or places, that appear on the label and are made from the advertised grape varieties, too."


Financial Times


Jancis Robinson MW says, the words "Japan, wine exporter" have an unlikely ring, but the new organization, Koshu of Japan, is keen to shine an international spotlight on it's native variety.


The national government and local authorities are supporting this new initiative, a drive set in motion only last year by the single-minded Yamanashi wine producer Shigekazu Misawa of Grace Winery. "It is my dream to see Koshu wine recognised for the qualities I know it can have," he says.


Robinson says: "What appeals to me about Koshu is its very lack of brashness, its delicacy, purity, limpidity, and the way it goes so well with the calmer regions of the Japanese gastronomic landscape."


Telegraph


Only a generation or two back there was scant knowledge of white wine in this country, says Susy Atkins.


Apart from keen wine buffs, to most a glass of white was just that - not specifically a Chardonnay, Riesling or Sauvignon. "It's good to think that most people choose more wisely today, knowing, at least roughly, what the key grapes taste like," she adds.


Yet there is still a tendency towards the obvious, states Atkins, and asks, "what about more unusual whites?" She gives an example as wine from the Rhone Valley, which Atkins says she rarely sees on supermarket shelves.


The Marsanne and Roussanne grapes can deliver nutty notes, peach and a hint of ginger, she says and Viognier adds a scented apricot quality. It's the independent merchants that have the real gems, such as Yapp Brothers, in Mere, Wiltshire, adds Atkins. "So put down that Pinot Grigio and give them a ring".


Independent

Amarone della Valpolicella, has just been granted its DOCG (Denominazione di Origine Controllata y Garantita) status.


Patricia Guy, an Italian wine expert living in Verona, questions whether quality is being cut and compromised. She says a genuine Amarone should smell of the drying process, of cherries and of spice that turns to incense as it ages.


Rose says, recent success has enabled producers to invest in improving the health and quality of a wine that was in danger of becoming old-fashioned. Modern Amarone is often made in a style that takes its place alongside powerful New World reds like Argentinian Malbec, Californian Zinfandel and Australian Shiraz.


He says a good introduction is Sainsbury's spicy, Taste the Difference Amarone 2006, (£14.69), but for greater flavour and intensity try the Masi Costasera Amarone Classico 2005, (£21.99, Tesco).

 

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